News

Search News
Categories
Filter
Experts
Date Range
In the News

South China Sea Militarization: Fighters in the Paracels and Combat Logistics

As a result, there are signs that U.S. strategic thinkers have given significant thought to the problems that Woody Island might pose in a potential military conflict with China, and how to neutralize it. A major fleet architecture study conducted earlier this year by the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Analysis for the U.S. Congress used an unlabeled graphic of Woody Island to illustrate new concepts for conducting amphibious raids against fortified archipelagos.

In the News

Overhaul of Counter-Espionage Laws Long Overdue: Expert

Dr Ross Babbage, who is a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments in Washington, says activities already being undertaken by foreign powers in this country have made the crackdown necessary.

In the News

Defense Industry Will Be Hurt by Government Shutdown, Even If It’s Brief

"In past shutdowns, including the longer shutdown in 2013, those people were paid retroactively," Blakeley said. "But there's no guarantee about that until Congress gets their act together and actually passes either a short-term spending bill or ideally a longer-term budget deal."

In the News

CSBA’s Mahnken on National Security Strategy, Priorities

Thomas Mahnken, president and CEO of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, discusses National Security Adviser Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster’s preview of President Donald Trump’s national security strategy, identifies priorities, and more during a Dec. 2, 2017, interview with Defense & Aerospace Report Editor Vago Muradian. The interview was conducted during the 2017 Reagan National Defense Forum, held at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum in Simi Valley, California. Our coverage is sponsored by Leonardo DRS.

In the News

America Needs to Step Up the Military to Keep China at Bay

According to a report by the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, “In constant dollars, defense spending fell from $768 billion in 2010 to $595 billion in 2015, a decline of nearly one-fourth, and President Obama’s final budget request was for only $583 billion” The report cited defense analyst Katherine Blakely, who has written that the rate of this drawdown “has been faster than any other post-war drawdown since the Korean War at a compound annual growth rate of -5.5 percent.” History will rightly assign the reigning commander-in-chief the lion’s share of the blame, but the so called military spending “sequester” was a bipartisan act that has yet to be reversed.